Adios to Mi Morenita de mi Corazon, Merida and Mexico for only a while I hope

11 07 2015

hislh

Carson McCullers wrote a first novel that has become a classic. One line from the book reads…

“Your heart going to beat hard enough to kill you because you don’t love and don’t have peace.”

Lucky for me I have both. Tomorrow I leave Merida for Denver for a TBD heart surgery. If I could afford the surgery I’d do it here. Imo Mexican medicine is that good.

The love and peace I have are from Mi Morenita, the love of my life, and the 2 best sons a man can have. Hopefully you will hear again from Merida’s Night Writer.





The Cruelest Month

2 04 2015

tSeliot_1497765ca

April started yesterday. Why did T. S. Eliot deem it so? Most of us know the opening words of “The Waste Land.” What comes after gives us a clue.

April is the cruellest month, breeding
Lilacs out of the dead land, mixing
Memory and desire, stirring
Dull roots with spring rain.

And so begins the first part (The Burial of the Dead) of a poetic masterpiece. Have we buried poetry? A friend asked me that question yesterday. Some still write it, but few read it. This is a new age. The hip-hop world has no time for elaborate mysticism. If it’s dirty put it down, bro. Down and dirty.

What was goin’ on with ole Tom when he wrote the 20th century’s most well-known lines? Well for one thing he had been working at the bank and had to get away. The guy had a mental breakdown. Who wouldn’t working with Lloyd’s of London? I know because I worked with some of them back in the day when I was a computer techie. Eliot went to the Albermarle Hotel in the English seaside resort Margate. Tom and I have something in common. I used to watch Russell vs Chamberlain at The White House owned by Red Klotz of the Washington Generals and party at The Gables dance club. My Margate is in New Jersey though.

whmargate

Everyday in Margate TS took a tram, watched the sea and wrote. It was after his time in Margate he changed the poem’s title. Ezra Pound suggested that he do so. It was originally called “He Do the Police in Different Voices” based on a Charles Dickens’ quote. I doubt with that title it ever would have become the most important poem of its time, however Jay Z would have recorded it.

Why “The Waste Land”? Could it have been in reaction to Margate’s Dreamland? Dreamland was the newly given name of the amusement park in Margate. It had been re-modeled after Coney Island in New York in 1920 by John Henry Iles who set up parks all over the world.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dreamland_Margate

In 2008 Dreamland caught on fire and became its own wasteland.

firedream

firedream2

It’s scheduled to re-open this year.

Maybe you’d like to mix memory with desire and stir a dull root with spring rain…

http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/176735





Donde Estas Amor?

11 10 2014

A well-done spanglish love poem…buen hecho, Fernando. Felicidades.

The Merida Review

by Fernando Izaguirre

Donde Estas Amor?

.
El Amor sueña
Abajo de la luna
Que miraba desde mi ventana
Where lagrimas fall
And the reflection
Of memories stay.

Donde estas mi amor?
You taught me how
To love with the edges of my fingertips
That traveled down the slope
Of your spine.

Donde estas my beautiful angel?
You took care of me when
My world got heavy and my
Arms were waning from lifting
It.

Mi Amor,
You are my completed poem
That bites the tongue
That wants to roll but the wheels
Are flat.

Come home my love
And the seagulls will
Surely fly again and arrow
Themselves into the sea
Where they found us.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Fernando Rafael Izaguirre, Jr., was born in 1993. He is an Honors student at Lee College in Baytown, Texas, majoring in…

View original post 97 more words





Photography by Sally Davies

26 09 2014

Photography by Sally Davies.





10 Great Quotations from George Bernard Shaw on His Birthday

26 07 2014

We need laughter more than ever. I don’t read the news any more to stop the tears. GBS had the gift like many another Brit. This is high praise coming from a Paddy.

Interesting Literature

It is impossible for an Englishman to open his mouth without making some other Englishman despise him. – Preface to Pygmalion

When I was a young man I observed that nine out of every ten things I did were failures. So I did ten times more work. – The Wordsworth Book of Humorous Quotations

Do not do unto others as you would that they should do unto you. Their tastes may not be the same. – Maxims for Revolutionists

Shaw1

He knows nothing; and he thinks he knows everything. That points clearly to a political career. – Major Barbara

I learned long ago, never to wrestle with a pig. You get dirty, and besides, the pig likes it.

No question is so difficult to answer as that to which the answer is obvious. – Saturday Review, 1895

Take care to get what you like or you will be forced to like what you get…

View original post 77 more words





Icarus and Saint Patrick

17 03 2014

Today we are all Irish and it’s a great day to be Irish. Congrats to Ireland Rugby for winning the 6 Nations in Paris…and so long it’s been good to know ya to the greatest rugby player ever to come out of Ireland – Brian O’Driscoll. What a perfect way to retire.

bodwtrophy

I’ve just recently started a project to help fund the publication of Songs of Icarus. My first novel about an Irish American kid who becomes a modern day Icarus.

The project for my novel is on Kickstarter.com. This link tells you what Kickstarter is and how it works…

  • https://www.kickstarter.com/hello?ref=footer
  • Most importantly here is the link to my project and the video that goes with it…

  • https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/449226382/songs-of-icarus-hemingway-meets-monk-the-heartbrea
  • May the road rise up to meet you and me, the wind be at our backs and may we be in heaven a half hour before the devil knows we’ve died.





    I’ll Never Forget the Day or the Man

    14 12 2013

    100px-Rwc1995
    1995 RWC flyover

    The Time: 8AM – June 24, 1995
    The Place: Rose & Crown Pub – Atlanta, Ga.
    The Event: New Zealand vs South Africa (The Last Amateur International Rugby Match)

    I didn’t normally spend Saturday morning in pubs but as an All Blacks fan I went to one to watch them win their second Rugby World Cup. The expectation was that they would be playing Australia but the Springboks defeated the Wallabies in the first match of the tournament and hadn’t lost a match since. No one had beaten the All Blacks. I was standing in a crowd of maybe 100 guys, mostly Kiwis and Afrikaners, watching one TV projection screen hanging from the ceiling. Sports pubs with HD screens weren’t yet popular hangouts in 1995.
    Maybe their foreign bodies hadn’t gotten over the jet lag yet but most of the guys had beers-in-hand as they watched. I jest; it wasn’t jet lag. A beer at 8AM for a rugger or fan from the Southern Hemisphere is their normal petite dejeuner. I have to be honest it’s not just the rugby crowd in the Southern Hemisphere whose love for beer is around-the-clock. I played some matches for Philadelphia Rugby Club where my mates used beer as mouthwash to rinse out Friday night’s hangover before playing. Sometimes the smell of the scrum was worse than the kicks I received at the bottom trying to get possession of the ball. As a card-carrying ex-rugger I hate to admit my beverage of choice was Perrier after an eye-opening Bloody Mary.
    I didn’t know much about South Africa at the time except that it had elected a black man president and overturned apartheid as the rule of the land. The fact that apartheid had ever been the rule of the land in SA gave me all the more reason to cheer on NZ’s rugby version of the NFL’s greatest RB Jim Brown. Jonah Lomu had scored 4 tries against England in the semifinal and in the pregame ceremony Nelson Mandela shook the Maori’s hand with wonder. He was 6’3, weighed 240 and ran like the wind devastating the opposition with the force of a tornado.

    rugby-jonah-lomu_93227-1440x900

    art.lomu.gi

    As has been documented elsewhere rugby was a white man’s sport in SA played in its all-white schools. Every now and then the TV cameras panned the stands and it was a mostly white audience. Chester Williams was the only black South African on the team. Ironically every now and then the mostly white audience chanted, “NELSON! NELSON! NELSON!” I was puzzled. Why the chant for a black man most of the crowd had voted against? I didn’t find out until later.

    WorldCup95pic6bg
    No one crossed the goal line during the game. A tryless affair that emphasized defense, stamina, determination and bone-crushing hits. The norm for rugby at the highest level. By the end of it all the exhaustion etched on the players’ faces reminded me of the faces of soldiers fighting real wars not make-believe ones. In 1995 there was no money earned by rugby players. They played for the love of the game. After the match a couple of South African players told of how they hitchhiked to a bar to celebrate and the look of awe on the face of the guy who picked them up. Better than the limo rides some American superstar jocks are fond of I’ll bet.
    As most of the world knows SA won that day. A thirty-something white South African was standing next to me most of the game with a young boy. I’d say he was about 10 years-old. When it was over I watched them cheer and hug. The man turned to me with tears in his eyes and stuck out his hand as an introduction. “Great game, great day. This is my son. I just told him we can finally be proud to say we are South Africans. We left the country so he wouldn’t grow up there with all the hatred.”

    bwrwc
    The answer to the question of why the “NELSON!” chant…Mandela had promised that if elected he would bring the white man’s game – the Rugby World Cup – to South Africa. The chant was white South Africa’s “thank you” to a great man who had forgiven them for 27 years of his own incarceration and countless deaths to his friends and countrymen.
    Since that unforgettable day I’ve learned a lot from film and books about the man I’ll never forget. I know he rests in peace. NELSON! NELSON! NELSON!

    nelpien

    Madiba-at-Rugby-World-Cup-1995

    If you’d like to see and hear more about how Mandela healed the wounds you might watch “16th Man” on Netflix. It’s an ESPN “30 by 30” documentary.








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